Cost of Ownership – Exotic Car Keys

A few months ago, we asked our automotive journalist to dig around a little bit and find out how expensive exotic car keys are for some of today’s more common exotic cars. From the Aston Martin DBS’s 4 figure crystal key fob to the Murcielago’s ordinary key, we break down some of today’s most expensive key sets. Here is the latest segment to our cost of ownership series: exotic car keys.

Sitting at a bar in Scottsdale a couple months ago with a friend, we noticed a middle-aged gentleman sitting alone who was paying an extraordinary amount of attention to the bartender. The man had placed his Bentley key in a very obvious and visible spot on the bar in an attempt to either make sure he was getting his drinks quickly or to impress the perky twenty-something who was slinging his scotch and soda.

“I wonder how much that key would cost to replace if it disappeared when he went to the restroom…” my friend asked jokingly. Clearly the key is a symbol of value more than an actual commodity itself, but it did raise the question of what replacement keys really cost. Lucky for you, the curiosity ends here, as we break it down for you below.

If the man at the bar driving the Bentley Azure happened to have his key disappear, Bentley would charge him $464.57 for the key and another $75 or so to program it. Not bad for a dressed up Audi A4 key.

Had he optioned for a Rolls-Royce Drophead over the Bentley, a spare key for his potential new bartender mistress would only cost $385.47.

Single keys for recent Ferrari models will set you back $686, but that’s not all you’ll have to pay. The dealership charges $225 to reprogram the key, and all spare keys must be reprogrammed at the exact same time or they will not work. By far and away the most annoying key process, but you can’t blame them for wanting to be thorough – especially for clients who find themselves in an unfortunate situation where theft could occur.

Aston Martin is among the most expensive for replacement keys. No surprise, as theirs are some of the most exquisite. A DBS, for example, will run $2,128.54. The DB9, with it’s much more simplistic design (and lack of crystal), costs $542 plus a programming fee of $155.

Porsche keys are on the affordable side. A new Panamera key can be had for under $200. Genuine Cayman or 911 blank keys can be found for under $50. On the high-end of Porsche, the Carrera GT rings in at $345 while the GT3 RS is a bit less expensive at $315.

Providing a VIN and proof of ownership for your Lamborghini Gallardo or Murcielago will grant you the opportunity to buy new keys. The remote portion for the G or Murci is the same at $138, but while a Gallardo key is only $117 to replace, the Murcielago is a whopping $838.

Of course, there are more economical aftermarket options for a majority of these makes, but having an aftermarket key for your Murci is about the same as replacing a diamond with a cubic zirconia. We’re just glad we never lost the key to our project Vantage. Make sure to check out the secrets to driving exotics for free, we have been doing it for over 10 years

Photo credit: Ronnie Renaldi Photography and Andrew Goodman

2004 Lamborghini Gallardo
Listed for sale at $98,000
Bought at $80,000 plus tax & tags
Drove for 4 months then posted for sale
Sold for $93,000 in less than 30 days
Made $9,000 in Profit


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